The God Equation

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All astronomical measurement is only possible using predictable cycles of motion.  A ‘Day’ is one turn of the Earth on its axis.  A ‘Year’ is one cycle of the Earth round the Sun.  There is also the moon’s cycle of 27.32 days, and Precession of the Equinoxes, which I will discuss later. Our measure of ‘Time’ is based on the ‘Day’.  This was broken down into day and night and this further divided into Midday and Midnight and lastly into Hours, Minutes and seconds.  Despite what scientists may say about a ‘Second’ being defined by atomic decay, the ‘Second’ is still a fraction of the ‘Day’.

And, because a Day is a repetitive cycle, we can also describe it in miles.  As it is the same principle as the mileometer, the Earths axial rotation can also be described as a length of 24887.64 miles – its length at the equator.  We have many ancient sites around the planet aligned to a specific astronomical event that proves the earths speed over thousands of years neither increases or decreases.  If it did, the monuments would not work. They would be out of synch with what they were designed for.

Then, an hour at the equator can also be described as 1/24day or 1026 miles.  But there are many paradoxes created by time when it is used as a Constant.  For example, on an old-fashioned clock-face, the tip of the minute hand moves from 12 to 3 in fifteen minutes.  And of course, a point halfway down the arm of the minute hand would also reach that point in 15 minutes.  But then it appears to have traveled slower than the tip since it covers a much smaller distance at the same time. Obviously, common sense tells you something is missing. It is not the Time that is the Constant, but the center of the clock.  It is against this point that the ratio of the two sections of the minute hand is found to be different lengths.  And the distance 12 – 3 for both lengths are again relative to the constant.

This gives us AC: BC = AD: BE, from which all astronomical measure can be made.

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